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Indian Summer

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Aaahhh… summer is NOT gone.  No no no, it is NOT!  Because we still have THESE coming out of our landscaping:

Yes, I said landscaping.

No, I didn’t mean “garden.”  We don’t have a garden. 

We grow tomatoes in our landscaping.  You’d have to see it to understand why it works, but trust me, it does.  Our landscaping is fairly, um, naturalized.  I mean that in the most complimentary way, I do!  We totally intended it to be that way. 

We have six tomato plants weaseled between the hydrangeas, barberry, burning bushes, ornamental grasses and smokebushes, and right now they all have a million green tomatoes on them.  STILL! 

These babies are Sweet One Hundreds.  Rachel Ray was cooking with them sometime last spring on one of her shows and I thought they looked adorable.  Aren’t they?  They’re, like, tiny!  So I snagged a four pak of seedlings (plus two Big Boy plants) when we made our too-early-for-reasonable-men-to-buy-annuals-but-we’re-suffering-from-debilitating-cabin-fever-and-must-see-green-plants trek to Buds & Blooms, the big huge greenhouse 15 miles east of town, last Mother’s Day weekend.  I swear, we’ve been harvesting a handful of these buggers every day for the last month and we’re still not sick of them.  Well, I mean, technically I’ll only eat them cooked in stuff, but Rick eats them like candy.  I guess as far as tomatoes go that means they’re pretty good. 

I do not eat raw tomatoes.  It’s pretty much the only food I truly hate.  So much so that I know when a sandwich place or fast food restaurant almost screwed up my special order, put the tomatoes on, then unwrapped the sandwich before I could find out, took off the tomatoes, wrapped it up again and served it to me anyway.  Gag!  Tomato residue on my bread – not cool. 

BUT!  My BFF Giada once roasted tomatoes in olive oil, salt & pepper and did something beautiful and simple with them like probably put them on a plate.  Drew me in like a moth to a flame (which may or may not happen everyday from 6:00 – 7:00 on Cooking Channel).  I added basil (because we planted an entire huge pot of that, too, last spring; it’s my favorite) and couldn’t resist.  The resulting dish smelled so incredible I had to try it.  Amazing!  This could be (and has been) its own special form of bruchetta on crostini, or a pasta sauce, or a topping on grilled chicken with parmesan cheese, or with caramelized onions in a summer salad like this incredible one from Joy… delish! 

Tonight we actually spread them on grilled chicken club sandwiches with spinach & provolone, kind of as a tomato jam.  Weird?  NO – amazing!  Sorry, we ate them before I could get pictures.  You’d understand if you’da been here. 

Oh, and yes, our basil is slowly becoming a houseplant.  I didn’t have the heart to leave it all out in the cold a few days ago so, at a friend’s recommendation I cut a few bunches and have put little vases of basil all over the house.  If I had to choose between roses or basil, you know what it’d be 😉   

Oh, PS:  that gorgeous olive oil was a gift from Jessica & Doug.  It came as a bonus one day along with a wonderful balsamic vinegar in our Cline wine-of-the-month club.  BONUS!

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About kozubalk

Lawyer by day, baker by night, full time creative spirit.

2 responses »

  1. Linda Schutt Levinson

    The only “cherry” tomatoes I have ever planted are the supersweet 100’s . They are awsome. Jim eats them raw by the bucket. I have done stuff to them like hollow them out and fill them with herbed cream cheese (piped in with star tip) the roasted tomato “jam” is very good. If you like rhubarb, I planted rhubarb in my landscape, the big leaves and red stems look great. I brought in a huge Thyme plant, 2 rosemarys and I cut the basil and have it on the windowsill rooting. Jim is picking our bartlett pears today. They are the little ones with yellow skin kissed with a pink blush and juicey as hell. BTW Jim is out of work , if you know anyone hiring let me know. XO

    Reply
  2. This is a wonderful post!!! I love it!

    Reply

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